Share

Smith Welch Webb & White Blog

Monday, February 3, 2014

How to Approach the SSDI Application Process

As an experienced attorney practicing in the Stockbridge, Georgia area, I know that applying for Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI) can be intimidating, especially if you are already faced with a serious medical condition.  I have helped many Georgians successfully compile their SSDI applications over the years, and wanted to provide some general information and helpful tips that will break down the application process into more manageable tasks.  

First, a little information about the process:  SSDI only makes payments to those who suffer from total disability (For details about how SS defines total disability, see my blog post entitled “Who is eligible for Social Security Disability?”).  If you do suffer from a severe medical condition or disability that prevents you from being able to work, then you should move forward with filing for SSDI benefits with the Social Security Administration (SSA).  It’s helpful to know that although you will file your application with the SSA and SSDI is a federal program, it is actually the Disability Adjudication Services (DAS) that decides whether Georgians are granted SSDI benefits.  After you file your initial disability application with Social Security, your file will be sent to the Georgia DAS.

An application is not considered complete without certain information and documentation.  Before you get started, here’s a list of things to have at your fingertips:

First: Medical Records

You will need to request comprehensive medical records from all of your doctors, including any tests, prescriptions and dosages.  A statement from your doctor describing your condition will also help strengthen your application.   More is better in this case – make sure you have ample evidence to back up your claim. 

Second: Insurance Claims

Reviewers will also want to see a list of all your insurance claims made through any insurance providers, including details such as the claim numbers.

Third: Tax History

Pull out your tax documents (such as W-2s) for inclusion in the application.  This information will be used to determine your financial needs.

Forth: Employment History

You will need to include job descriptions along with the contact information for former employers. This information will help reviewers determine whether you can resume any former employment with your current medical condition.

Fifth: Info for your Dependents

If you have dependents, you will need to gather their Social Security numbers for the application.

Every state has different approval rates for SSDI applications. The Georgia DAS has a lower approval rate than the national average, and less than one third of applicants are granted benefits with their initial application.  If granted, the average SSDI payment in 2013 was approximately $1,100 per month.  If your initial application is denied, you can still file a request for reconsideration and/or an appeal.  Details on how to request reconsideration or an appeal can be found in the denial letter.  Typically, your next step will be to contact the Social Security office nearest you, but be sure to check the letter for deadlines related to requests or appeals before filing it away. 

Applications are often denied based on mistakes or technicalities that could be avoided if you work with someone who can help you assemble the information necessary for a strong and complete application.  Whether you are applying for the first time, or considering an appeal after being denied, you can leverage our experience and know-how to ensure that your SSDI application is solid, accurate and properly submitted. 

For more information on this topic, email Casey Crumbley at ccrumbley@smithwelchlaw.com or call him at (770) 957-3937.  Smith, Welch, Webb and White is recognized as a premier law firm throughout the state of Georgia. We have an uncompromising commitment to serving our clients and our community. Our team of experts routinely handles a wide range of legal matters, and will provide outstanding service for you, your family or your business.

 

Any representations regarding the law in this Blog is made available for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog publisher. The Blog should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.


Archived Posts

2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
2014
November
October
September
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2013
2011


Smith Welch Webb & White serve clients throughout the south metro Atlanta area including but not limited to McDonough, Stockbridge, DeKalb County, Clayton County, Henry County, Peach County, Jonesboro, Spalding County, Butts County, and Lamar County.



© 2019 Smith Welch Webb & White | Disclaimer
280 Country Club Drive, Suite 300, Stockbridge, GA 30281
| Phone: 855-505-7999

Attorneys | Practice Areas | FAQs | Locations | Jobs | News & Blogs

Law Firm Website Design by
Amicus Creative


Make a Payment