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Monday, September 22, 2014

Child Support in Georgia

The end of a marriage does not mean the end of a relationship with the children. Parents are still expected to provide financial and emotional support for their children, and lapses in these obligations can lead to legal action. 

Child support laws in Georgia require the non-custodial parent to make child support payments based on number of factors, such as the number of children who need financial support, income, medical insurance and other income and expenses.
 
As an experienced family law attorney practicing in the Henry County area, I help many parents work through the complex rules and guidelines associated with child support, including a financial analysis to help determine child support payments and a course of action if payments are missed or not paid in full.

When the non-custodial parent does not pay child support - whether it's a portion of the payment, all of the payment or failure to maintain medical insurance - the parent may be found in "contempt of court" and an enforcement action can take place. Enforcement can take many forms, including but not limited to: Monetary fines. Withholding from paychecks, unemployment checks, tax refunds or workers comp benefits to fund child support payments. Drivers license suspension. Or even a jail sentence

When making up for missed or partial payments, the non-custodial parent is still obligated to pay the full amount of current payments, plus the past-due amount. If the non-custodial parent is unable to pay due to a major change in life circumstance, he or she may need to take action to modify the child support order.

Making Changes to the Child Support Order

Some parents ask if, or when, it is possible to make changes to the child support order. Either parent has the right to modify child support every two years, but a parent has to show there has been a change in circumstances. Additionally, modifications can be filed sooner if there is loss of employment by either party, a change in primary custody, or by other factors. A family law attorney can walk you through the steps required to modify child support, which must be filed in a court to be binding on both parties.

For more information on child custody or other family law issues, contact Elizabeth Pool here or call (770) 775-3188 to schedule an appointment.  Smith, Welch, Webb and White is recognized as a premier law firm throughout the state of Georgia. Our team of experts routinely handles a wide range of legal matters, and will provide outstanding service for you, your family or your business.

 

 Any representations regarding the law in this Blog is made available for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog publisher. The Blog should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

 


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